Scales without Units

Determine Scale by Measurement.

Here is the Apollo Lunar Module. It is drawn at a scale of 1 to 50. The “legs” of the spacecraft are its landing gear.

(1). Use the applet above to estimate the actual length of each leg on the sides. Write your answer to the nearest 10 centimeters.

(2). Explain how you estimated the actual length of each leg.

(3). Use the drawing to estimate the actual height of the Apollo Lunar Module to the nearest 10 centimeters. Show your reasoning or explain below.

(4). Explain how you estimated the actual height of the Apollo Lunar Module.

(5). Neil Armstrong was 71 inches tall when he went to the surface of the Moon in the Apollo Lunar Module. How tall would he be in the drawing if he were drawn with his height to scale? Show your reasoning.

(6). Explain how you determined Neil Armstrong’s height in the drawing.

(7). Sketch a stick figure to represent yourself standing next to the Apollo Lunar Module. Make sure the height of your stick figure is to scale. Show how you determined your height on the drawing.

Figures R, S, and T are all scaled copies of one another. Figure S is a scaled copy of R using a scale factor of 3. Figure T is a scaled copy of S using a scale factor of 2. Find the scale factor for the following:

(1). From T to S

(2). From S to R

(3). From R to T

(4). From T to R

The table shows the distance between the Sun and 8 planets in our solar system.

(1). If you wanted to create a scale model of the solar system that could fit somewhere in your school, what scale would you use?

(2). The diameter of Earth is approximately 8,000 miles. What would the diameter of Earth be in your scale model?